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Onion tart

The title “onion tart” can frighten you if you are not born in the East of France. In principle, the word tart is reserved for sweet foods and it is hard to imagine feasting on a tart with onions generously sprinkled with custard, jam or chocolate.

And yet, what a delight this onion tart! It is one of the oldest recipes of the Alsatian culinary repertoire and remains a must for Alsatian brasseries, accompanied, of course, by a glass of Alsace white wine.

Traditionally, the onion tart cooked in the heat of the last embers after cooking the bread, so it was natural to prepare it with bread dough. Over the years, the recipe has evolved to give way to the “pâte brisée”. The word " brisée " means "broken" because the dough can easily break because it has less butter than other dough.

Ingredients (Serve 6/8)

- 350g "broken" dough

- 1,5Kg onions

200g of crème fraîche Tatua (in default, sour cream)

- 2 eggs

- Salt, pepper

- 250g streaky bacon (optional)

Directions

- Sweat the onions thinly sliced ​​in a frying pan (with bacon  but optional), add salt and pepper

- Beat the eggs with the cream.

- Preheat the oven to 180 ° C

- When the onions have blunted and begin to caramelize, add the egg / cream mixture out of the heat.

- Salt and pepper

- Spread the “broken" dough

- Prick the dough with a fork

- Pour the mixture on the broken dough spread in a pie pan

- Bake 30 min in the oven.